11 Awesome Products To Make Your Camper More Stable

Scissor Jack Can Make Your Camper More Stable

When we first started RVing, our camper was a little unstable. It rocked every time someone moved around. I wanted to find out how to make my camper more stable. I did some research and found some products that can fix my problem.

Here are 11 awesome products that will make your camper more stable.

  1. Solid Rubber Wheel Chocks
  2. Stabilizing Jacks
  3. Valterra RV Stabilizer
  4. RV Step Stabilizer
  5. RV Trailer Stabilizer Leveling Scissor Jacks
  6. Heavy-Duty Slide Supports
  7. Telescoping Trailer Stabilizer
  8. Tripod 5th Wheel Stabilizer
  9. Mor/Ryde StepAbove
  10. High Speed Power Stabilizer Jack Kit
  11. JT’s Strong Arm Fifth-Wheel Jack Stabilizer Kit

Nobody likes it when the camper is always rocking every time someone moves around a little. A stable camper or RV can make a big difference in how much sleep you get and the general level of enjoyment you get out of your trip.

Buying a couple of extra pieces of equipment to ensure your camper is stable is well worth it.

What IS The Right Camper Stabilization Solution For You?

The amount of time, energy, and money you’re going to need to spend to make your RV more stable is going to vary depending on how bad it shakes and the type of camper, trailer, or RV you have.

The 11 camper stabilization solutions below are roughly listed from simple to more complicated, and cheaper to more expensive. You’ll have to be the judge of what your think will solve your specific camper rocking issue and will fit your budget.

1. Solid Rubber Wheel Chocks

Wheel chocks are first on this list for a reason. Wheel chocks should be standard equipment for every camper, travel trailer, 5th wheel, or RV. If you don’t have wheel chocks and your camper is unstable too, there is a good chance someone will get hurt. If you are going to RV, you need wheel chocks. Period.

If you are using wood blocks or other random items as a chock, it could be making your stabilization problem worse. Uneven pressure against the tires may work okay as a chock but may allow tires to give and flex more because of focused pressure points. A heavy-duty rubber chock distributes the pressure over a wider area of the tire, enabling less give when someone is moving around in the camper.

2. Adjustable Stabilizing Jacks

The second option most people should consider for camper stabilization is some adjustable RV/Trailer Stabilizing Jacks. These jacks are relatively inexpensive for a set of four and don’t require any specialized installation. Slide a jack under your camper and hand-crank it up till it provides support to the frame of your trailer.

RV Stabilizing Jacks are a fantastic option for small travel trailers or pop up campers. These types of tow-able campers generally sit lower to the ground or may not have built-in stabilizers. If your RV sits higher off the ground, you might need to lift these jacks with wood or leveling blocks. That additional expense and weight might make other options more attractive.

3. Valterra RV Stabilizer

The Valterra RV Stabilizer is a relatively inexpensive and lightweight option for RVs that sit a little higher off the ground. It can support RVs that sit as high as 28 inches off the ground. The Valterra is constructed of aluminum and only weighs about 3 lbs so that it won’t add a bunch of unnecessary weight like other options.

The lightweight construction only supports a max of about 250 lbs, so that you may want more than one. It is also probably not the best idea if you are trying to stabilize a large 5th wheel or toy hauler. It may not be strong enough.

4. RV Step Stabilizer

If you’re generally happy with your camper stabilization, but don’t care for the way it rocks when you use the steps, this RV Step Stabilizer is a great option. I have personally installed this on our 2017 Salem, and it works great. If you’re looking for something more heavy-duty, skip to the Mor/Ryde Steps at #9.

The idea with this piece of equipment is that it provides a stabilizing leg that supports the lowest step on your RV. So when you step up into it, there is no flex. It is one of the cheapest options on this list. I didn’t rank it higher only because it only helps with stabilization due to the steps, and it does require minor installation (just a few nuts and bolts).

5. RV Trailer Stabilizer Leveling Scissor Jacks

If none of the above items seem like they are your ideal solution, consider some RV scissor jacks. Most campers, travel trailers, or 5th wheels come with some version of these. Your RV may not have any, or the existing equipment may need to be supplemented by some additional jacks.

These scissor jacks should be installed on the frame of your camper, but it is something most people can do themselves. If you’re uncomfortable with installing them yourself, you may want to consider #2 from above instead (Adjustable Stabilizing Jacks).

6. Heavy-Duty Slide Supports

Slide supports are a perfect option for RVs with slide-outs that may rock when someone is in that area. Much like the RV Step Stabilizer from #4, slide supports prevent the trailer from rocking due to downward movement as you get farther and farther out from the center of the RV.

Super slides on an RV can have a lot of weight that is moved outwards from the trailer and starts to act as a lever. The amount of movement needed to rock the RV in this situation isn’t much. Propping a slide stabilizer under your slide out with stop that from occurring.

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7. Telescoping Trailer Stabilizer

Telescoping trailer stabilizers are a little different and are not for everyone. They are ideal for smaller popup campers or travel trailers. This specific set is good for about 1000 lbs each. Because it installs on the underside of your camper, it won’t eat up valuable storage space in a smaller trailer or camper.

They are not very expensive and require a minor installation. Once installed, the stabilizers are easy to deploy at your selected campground and fold away nicely when traveling.

8. Tripod 5th Wheel Stabilizer

If you’re RVing in a 5th wheel and having stabilization issues, you should invest in a tripod pin stabilizer. This piece of equipment is designed to fit up under your 5th wheel pin and brace it against the ground. It works by the same basic premise as slide-out supports.

Before you purchase a tripod 5th wheel stabilizer, you need to take a few measurements. 5th wheels come in all kinds of sizes, and tripods are not necessarily universal. You’re going to want to measure how high your pin sits off the ground and check the tripod stabilizer description to make sure you’re buying the right size.

9. Mor/Ryde StepAbove

Mor/Ryde steps are a fantastic option to help improve your camper’s stability. These steps will fully brace themselves against the ground so the trailer won’t move when you first step up. This is the big brother to the RV Step Stabilizer above.

Often, RV dealers will offer this as an option when you’re buying a new RV. The advantage of purchasing with a new RV is that the dealer will properly install it for you. If you want to add these steps to an existing RV, you’re going to want to take some measurements to purchase the correct size.

10. High Speed Power Stabilizer Jack Kit

The Lippert Stabilizer Kit isn’t just a little add on. This kit can be a full stabilization upgrade for your RV. If your existing stabilization system is insufficient or no longer works, you probably want to look into this kit. Not only can it handle bigger and heavier RVs and trailers, but it can also do it with a simple push of a button.

The Lippert kit is a much more expensive option than others on this list. It also required a significant installation. The Lippert Power Stabilizer Jack Kit is probably unnecessary for minor rocking but may be a great option if you’re having a significant issue.

11. JT’s Strong Arm Fifth-Wheel Jack Stabilizer Kit

JT’s Stabilizer Kit can make your 5th wheel extremely stable. This kit attaches crossbars between your RV frame and the existing RV landing gear. The resulting triangles are very sturdy and lock it in tight. Use this in connection with a pin stabilizer for a rock-solid camper.

A dealer can install the kit, but it is certainly possible to install it yourself if you’re handy. Before buying, you need to make sure you have at least 58″ of space between your two front landing gears. That gives enough room to attach the crossbars in the front.

How To Make Your Camper More Stable Summary

Nobody likes a camper that is shaky and unstable. Every time someone rolls over in their bed at night, everyone else in the trailer feels it. It is unlikely that an RV will ever be as stable as your house, but it doesn’t mean you have to accept excessive shaking. The gear on this list should help make your camper more stable.

Want to learn about some other ways to upgrade your camper? You can see our other gear reviews here.

Andy Beckman

Andy and his wife Niki had their twins Adilynn and Archer, in 2014. By 2017 the whole family was camping. It is a great way to unplug from the daily grind and focus on what it means to be a family. They started a YouTube channel in early 2020 and enjoyed creating content that new RVers find useful.

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